[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Polyurethane Foam Mfg: Methylene Chloride Substitute -Reply



Bob and/or Judith,

We have been working on a project to breakdown cured polyurethane
foam.  We had a glass vial encased in polyurethane foam that we
wanted to remove.  We used n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) to break
down the foam into a slurry.  The "breakthrough" time was decreased by
adding heat to the sample.  Additionally, we added the required
technology to recycle the NMP onsite.  It is a very good chemical.  You
can get information on NMP from ARCO Chemical among other
manufacturers at http://www.arcochem.com/products/.  There are many
manufacturers of NMP.

You should be aware than NMP is listed on the Toxic Release Inventory
(TRI) for reporting under SARA Title 313.  However, ARCO is leading the
fight to have it removed.  It is an excellent solvent with little to no health
effects.  It does not meet the characteristics of a RCRA hazardous
waste.

I would be happy to have one of my colleagues provide you more
information.  Feel free to contact me at the address below.

Thanks!  And Good Luck!

Kenny


Kenny Steward
Pollution Prevention
Pantex Plant
ksteward@pantex.com

>>> "Kennedy, Judith C." <JKEN461%ecy.wa.gov@internet.pantex.com>
07/02/97 11:00am >>>

Hi, folks.  First of all, I'd like to thank you all for the quick and 
comprehensive responses to my last request regarding supercritical CO2

cleaning.

I'm working with a small polyurethane foam manufacturer (they make
seat 
cushions for old cars!) that uses a low-pressure machine that
automatically 
rinses the mixing head after each run with methylene chloride.  What I'm 
looking for are case studies of the use of substitutes for the methylene 
chloride in these machines.

I should note that I already know of other alternatives, such as 
high-pressure machines, self-cleaning mixing heads, etc.  This situation 
requires a substitute for the methylene chloride, if any exist that work.

I have also looked at the case study database in Envirosense, as well as

other Web sites, and the P2Tech archives.  I didn't find anything that 
answers this question.

So, if any of you out there have had experience with this sort of
operation, 
and have documented examples of substitutes that do the trick, please
let me 
know.  Thanks!  Please e-mail me directly as well as the listserve.

Bob Goldberg
Washington State Department of Ecology
P.O. Box 47775
Olympia, WA  98504-7775
(360) 407-6350
fax: (360) 407-6305
e-mail: bgol461@ecy.wa.gov
URL: www.wa.gov/ecology/hwtr/


-- BEGIN included message


Hi, folks.  First of all, I'd like to thank you all for the quick and 
comprehensive responses to my last request regarding supercritical CO2 
cleaning.

I'm working with a small polyurethane foam manufacturer (they make seat 
cushions for old cars!) that uses a low-pressure machine that automatically 
rinses the mixing head after each run with methylene chloride.  What I'm 
looking for are case studies of the use of substitutes for the methylene 
chloride in these machines.

I should note that I already know of other alternatives, such as 
high-pressure machines, self-cleaning mixing heads, etc.  This situation 
requires a substitute for the methylene chloride, if any exist that work.

I have also looked at the case study database in Envirosense, as well as 
other Web sites, and the P2Tech archives.  I didn't find anything that 
answers this question.

So, if any of you out there have had experience with this sort of operation, 
and have documented examples of substitutes that do the trick, please let me 
know.  Thanks!  Please e-mail me directly as well as the listserve.

Bob Goldberg
Washington State Department of Ecology
P.O. Box 47775
Olympia, WA  98504-7775
(360) 407-6350
fax: (360) 407-6305
e-mail: bgol461@ecy.wa.gov
URL: www.wa.gov/ecology/hwtr/



-- END included message