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CORRECTION: International Paper Recycling Plant -Reply



Just to add a bit more perspective to what happened with the 100% recycled content copier paper --

This product is made from old newspapers and magazines, which means that it is a groundwood paper (i.e., it
contains a substance known as lignin).  Deterioration of lignin is what causes newspapers to yellow.  As a result,
this product is not an archival quality product and will deteriorate.  For drafts of documents and copies that you don't
intend to keep, the groundwood content is not a problem, but if you intend to keep a file copy, it will become a
problem over time, as other respondents have noted. 

Because it is a groundwood paper, the Unity copier paper cannot be added to white office paper collection
programs.  Here at U.S. EPA headquarters, the switch to this paper changed the value of our recyclable paper from
a high value, high grade paper to a nearly valueless mixed paper.  As a result, we lost revenue from our recyclable
paper.

In addition, there have been problems with performance.  While it is true that this paper generally performed in all of
our copiers, printers, and plain paper fax machines, it is also true that we frequently had to fan it in order to avoid
jamming.

Many paper companies thought that President Clinton's recycling executive order, which set a 20% postconsumer
content standard for office papers purchased by federal agencies, would create high demand for recycled content
papers.  For a variety of reasons, demand has not been as high as anticipated in either the public or the private
sectors.

Dana Arnold
Municipal Information & Analysis Branch
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
401 M Street, S.W. (5306W)
Washington, DC 20460
arnold.dana@epamail.epa.gov