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UV Curable Coatings



    Peter et al,
    
    Dr. Alexander Ross, who has posted a few messages to this list, 
    has mentioned RADTECH's work in this area.  Dr. Ross has mailed 
    some information to me recently and has offered this information 
    over the list in the recent past.  Phone 703-534-1901, or check 
    the recently mended archives for additional information.  PLEASE 
    DO NOT CONSIDER THIS INFORMATION A REFERRAL FOR RADTECH OR THE 
    SERVICES THEY OFFER.  (Dr. Ross, sorry for having to include the 
    disclaimer.  Thanks again for mailing your literature to me.)
    
    As I mentioned in my previous message, the furniture manufacturer 
    I observed using UV coatings only applied the coating to SELECT 
    surfaces...basically flat pieces like cabinet backs, and less 
    obvious areas.  The system used was not designed to compete with 
    higher quality coating application methods.  (The system may have 
    been early technology and I hope the learning curve has expanded 
    potential aplications for UV curable coatings.)  Nooks and 
    crannies, uneven surfaces, curves, etc. were not possible with the 
    system I observed.  Radiation used to cure the coating is 
    dependent on maintaining an optimum distance from the item being 
    coated (I think).
    
    In talking with a coatings expert, I inquired if UV's could be 
    applied to items such as door skins, where surface differences of 
    maybe an inch (or slightly greater) exist along with some inside 
    edges or detailing (I was thinking about the doorskin manufacturer 
    I mentioned with all the waste paint).  He believed this should 
    not be a problem, although he did reference the surface/radiation 
    source distance element and indicated that two or more radiation 
    sources may be needed to cure coating applied at varying surface 
    depths.  Only recently did I learn that a local company was 
    actually using the technology on door skins.  It should be noted 
    that I know nothing about the working doorskin system...for all I 
    know their skins may be flat or only have minor surface 
    variations.
    
    Like most coating application, the type of coating, material being 
    coated, application system, and several other factors combine to 
    make the system successful.  In this respect, UV's are probably 
    much better for some uses than for others.  The company I observed 
    using the UV's did benefit from no VOC's and very very little 
    waste from that part of the operation.  Other furniture coating 
    areas of the facility (the vast majority of work being performed) 
    still generated VOC's.
    
    Ric
    illig.richard@a1.dep.state.pa.us