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Re: latex paint waste



There are a number of steps that can be taken to reduce the amount of water that is used in cleaning up latex paints.  The water can be used multiple times as a precleaning for painting equipment, since it has a lot of cleaning power left.  Then use clean water only for a final rinse.  This can result in a reduction to less than ten percent of the water formerly used.
 
If you really have a lot of it, the solids can be separated by settling and decanting (or by centrifuge -- but $$$).  Then the solids can be disposed of separately.
 
Few latex paints clean up waters will be hazardous -- but some states may treat them as such.  In addition, some inspectors and regulators are very suspicious of any paint related wastes.
 
Ralph
 
Ralph E. Cooper, Ph.D.
J.D. expected May 1999
Case Western University School of Law
 
14139 Woodstream
San Antonio, TX 78231
210-479-5490 (4)
rmcooper@flash.net
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: List Manager <listman@wmrc.hazard.uiuc.edu>
To: p2tech@great-lakes.net <p2tech@great-lakes.net>
Date: Friday, April 09, 1999 12:05 PM

Approved: p2net
To: p2tech@great-lakes.net
From: "James Hermann" <jhermann@EPSresin.com>
Subject: RE: Reply Lacy A. Meyer re disposal of water based coatings

>I am trying to switch my company from a solvent based paint to a
>water based one. Even though water based paints have no VOC's,
>will I still have to ship the paint waste hazardous.
>Please advise.
>Lacy A. Meyer
>HTC X8678
>Lmeyer@hydril.com
According to data and guidance that is provided by the National Paint and
Coatings Association (www.paint.org), current water-based latex paint (with
cosolvents) does not exhibit any characteristics of a Federal Hazardous
Waste.
Jim