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RE: green manufacturing regulations-reply



WJW,

You're right that there are no US laws that are titled "the green
manufacturing act of ..."
However, some rules create green manufacturing requirements under different
names. For instance,  EPA recently promulgated rules that regulate the
concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in various coating
products (known as the 183 (e) rules
http://www.epa.gov/ttnuatw1/coat/coat183e.html ).  I believe that the state
of California also regulates VOC content in certain consumer products. 

Many states, as part of their SIP plans,  have implemted RACT rules that are
effectively requirements for industrial facilities to use low-VOC coatings
(there's usually an option to use a control device, but the emphasis is on
reformulation).   

Phaseouts of various types are a form of green manufacturing mandate: e.g.,
ozone-depleting chemicals phaseout under the Montreal Protocol (implemented
by domestic legislation in many countries). Another example would be local
bans of product ingredients (like phosphates in laundry soap). 

I'd argue that the state pollution prevention planning laws could also be
considered green manufacturing regulations, even where they don't mandate
specific production actions. See for instance, the Massachusetts plan at
http://www.magnet.state.ma.us/dep/bwp/dhm/tura/turaover.htm

regards,
Melissa Malkin Weber 
Research Triangle Institute, Pollution Prevention Program 
POB 12194 
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 
voice: (919) 541-6154     fax (919) 541 7155 
http://www.rti.org/units/ese/p2/ppb.html 



-----Original Message-----
From: wjw5@email.psu.edu [mailto:wjw5@email.psu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 1999 11:16 PM
To: georgetang@itri.org.tw
Cc: p2tech@great-lakes.net
Subject: green manufacturing regulations-reply


George-

I know of no such regulations in the US (or elsewhere for that matter). The
US does have a Pollution Prevention law and is integrating P2 into
environmental regulations as they are revised. This is having some effect.

The pressures toward green manufacturing (and design, distrubution,
purchase, disposal) are becoming stronger, however. The irony is that these
pressures are not coming from the government. The pressures are coming from
the need to be competitive in a free market world economy. And companies
are finding that their customers are pushing them in that direction, in
part from concern for the environment, but more importantly to the
customer, as a means of ensuring that their suppliers will remain viable
AND provide them with good products at competitive prices.

The vehicle the customer firms are using is ISO 14000. The large ones such
as Ford, General Motors, IBM and Lucent Technologies are requiring their
suppliers to implement ISO 14001 registered environmental management
systems (EMSs). Though its still early in the ISO 14000 game here in the
US, there is now growing evidence that companies that implement an EMS find
substantial cost savings as they manage their environmental affairs
systematically as required by the standard.

The regulatory community in the US views ISO 14000 as a "voluntary
standard" as opposed to a "regulatory requirement". Some buy the concept;
others don't. The fact is that as more and more firms implement ISO 14001
conformant EMSs, there will become more and more anecdotal and quantifiable
evidence that being green and appropriately managing one's environmental
affairs not only creates good public relations, but propels them toward
high performance, cuts costs, avoids compliance issues and helps to protect
the environment, all at the same time. And often times, firms find that
they can improve product quality, make products that have a better
acceptance in the marketplace, lower inventory levels and cut manufacturing
lead times as well. This is win - win - win.

Though not exactly what you requested, this may be very insightful to you.

wjw/





>X-Authentication-Warning: superior.great-lakes.net: majordom set sender to
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>Date: Mon, 22 Nov 1999 13:52:09 -0500
>From: "Wendy Fitzner" <FITZNERW@state.mi.us>
>To: <p2tech@great-lakes.net>
>Subject: green manufacturing regulations.
>Mime-Version: 1.0
>X-MIME-Autoconverted: from quoted-printable to 8bit by
>superior.great-lakes.net id BAA07869
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>Reply-To: "Wendy Fitzner" <FITZNERW@state.mi.us>
>List-Name: P2Tech
>X-Loop: P2Tech
>
>P2 techers,
>A co-worker forwarded this request to me.  If you have any knowledge of
>specific green manufacturing regulations, please respond directly to this
>person.
>Thanks,
>Wendy
>
>
>Greetings from George Shin-Ru Tang:
>
>Sorry interrupt you.  But your input is very important.
>Can you guide me to access information of any regulation or requirement  in
>industralized countries such as US, Canada,  European countries, Japan,
etc.
>which were set up to move industry toward green manufacturing, design,
>distrubution, purchase, dispose, etc. For example, regulations on
lead-free,
>other toxic material free, raw material requirement, package material, etc.
>If possible,  I also need the recommended technology information for
industries
>to comply with these regulations or requirements.
>
>Thank you for your kindly help.
>Please also forward this message to any one who may provide assistance.
>
>                    George, Shin-Ru Tang
>                    NCCP, Taiwan
>***************************************************************************
>*******
>
>
>              georgetang@itri.org.tw
>        03-5732663
>Please note that my E-mail address has been changed to
georgetang@itri.org.tw
>My Telephone No. is 886-3-5732663
>***************************************************************************
>*******
>
>
>
>
>
>Wendy Fitzner, Unit Chief
>Program Management
>Pollution Prevention Section
>Environmental Assistance Division
>Michigan DEQ
>P.O. Box 30457
>2nd Floor Town Center, 333 S. Capitol
>Lansing, MI  48909-7957
>517-373-8798
>517-335-4729 (fax)
>fitznerw@state.mi.us
>

wjw5@psu.edu

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PENNTAP
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ph: (717) 848-6669

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