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Re: Anyone know the chemicals in digital thermometers?



I suspect there may be msds information for digital thermometers.  Becton-Dickinson would be a good source to obtain msds information (or I suspect so since they are a fairly large producer of medical equipment).

With the focus on mercury reduction, there may have been little attention paid to alternatives such as digital thermometers.  Essentially, a digital thermometer would include a plastic case, thermistor, battery, wiring, insulation.  Most seem constructed awkwardly such that battery replacement is a near impossibility.

What are the viable (accuracy, price, life cycle consequences, etc.) alternatives to purchasing and using a mercury thermometer?  Using a mercury thermometer (from the standpoint of the general public) may no longer be an option [in the future].

There have been several thermometer exchange programs in connection with earth day events, tox away programs, hospital exchanges, area events as a result of a widely (from the standpoint of Indiana) publicized spill, etc.) mostly funded by Indiana businesses.  Some complaints have arisen as a result of weak batteries (short lived devices).

It is hard to know what might be a better option than the digital . . . I know there are the plastic strips, non-mercury (metallics), aural, but not certain about their environmental consequences either.

Mark C. Stoddard
Compliance & Technical Assistance Program
317-233-1039
http://www.state.in.us/idem/ctap
mstoddar@dem.state.in.us 

>>> <Buxbaum.Diane@epamail.epa.gov> 05/15/01 03:53PM >>>

Do not want to encourage hospitals to give out what may be as harmful as Hg
thermometers.

diane

Diane D. Buxbaum, MPH
US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 2
Compliance Assistance and Program Support Branch
290 Broadway, 21st Floor, East
New York, New York 10007
212-637-3919 (fax 212-637-4086)
I suspect there may be msds information for digital thermometers.  Becton-Dickinson would be a good source to obtain msds information (or I suspect so since they are a fairly large producer of medical equipment).
 
With the focus on mercury reduction, there may have been little attention paid to alternatives such as digital thermometers.  Essentially, a digital thermometer would include a plastic case, thermistor, battery, wiring, insulation.  Most seem constructed awkwardly such that battery replacement is a near impossibility.
 
What are the viable (accuracy, price, life cycle consequences, etc.) alternatives to purchasing and using a mercury thermometer?  Using a mercury thermometer (from the standpoint of the general public) may no longer be an option [in the future].
 
There have been several thermometer exchange programs in connection with earth day events, tox away programs, hospital exchanges, area events as a result of a widely (from the standpoint of Indiana) publicized spill, etc.) mostly funded by Indiana businesses.  Some complaints have arisen as a result of weak batteries (short lived devices).
 
It is hard to know what might be a better option than the digital . . . I know there are the plastic strips, non-mercury (metallics), aural, but not certain about their environmental consequences either.
 
Mark C. Stoddard
Compliance & Technical Assistance Program
317-233-1039
http://www.state.in.us/idem/ctap
mstoddar@dem.state.in.us

>>> <Buxbaum.Diane@epamail.epa.gov> 05/15/01 03:53PM >>>

Do not want to encourage hospitals to give out what may be as harmful as Hg
thermometers.

diane

Diane D. Buxbaum, MPH
US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 2
Compliance Assistance and Program Support Branch
290 Broadway, 21st Floor, East
New York, New York 10007
212-637-3919 (fax 212-637-4086)


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