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Re: A question for consideration to the Listman eg. Good report on "What IS clean technology?"



Hi P2Techers,

Our library provides this service through the Greenlist Bulletin, a weekly
e-zine to a selected list.  Let me know if you would like to try it for a
while.  This week's sample is below.  I pass to the library all titles from
P2Tech for inclusion.

Janet Clark
At 11:34 AM 4/29/2002 -0400, you wrote:
>This is probably an excellent article. When will I get time to read it? Is
>that not a common dilemma with all readers on this service? 
>Question: Is there any interest in forming a Executive Review/Summary team on
>this service? It might be very helpful for large circulations such as this
>list service.  How it works is, if there are 300 members on this service,
>once every 300 articles, each member would be asked to do a brief summary of
>an article. The Resident Overseer of the list service deems which articles
>might of interest and use to the group. As Burton does now. Each member gets
>assigned a number from 1- to 300 in this example, and the Overseer sends the
>article out to a numbered member, according to order of receipt. The Reader
>has 5 days ( not including weekends) to read it and give the group a brief
>overview of the contents. If the whole list does not agree to being readers,
>( probably likely) then smaller reading groups can be formed and the same
>routine applies. In this case, summaries need not be available for the whole
>group.Or they may be available whatever the individual Reader decides. Just a
>thought for comment. 
>Deborah MacCormac
>FDEP - Central District - Orlando
> 
>
>	-----Original Message----- 
>	From: Listman [mailto:listman@wmrc.uiuc.edu] 
>	Sent: Mon 29-Apr-02 10:22 AM 
>	To: P2tech@great-lakes.net 
>	Cc: 
>	Subject: Good report on "What IS clean technology?"
>	
>	
>
>		Forwarded on behalf of Mr. Hamner.
>		
>		This is a well-written report based on lots of discussions
>with =
>		businesses and others.  Not too long, and brings in a lot of
>broad =
>		perspectives.  Of course the answer to "What is clean
>technology?" is, =
>		"Well it depends...."  The report attempts to categorize
>clean tech =
>		based on some good criteria.
>		
>		The report can be downloaded from
>		http://www.cleanedge.com/reports-gbn.php
>		
>		There are several other interesting reports available there
>too.
>		
>		Burt Hamner
>		www.cleanerproduction.com <http://www.cleanerproduction.com/>
>------=_NextPart_000_016D_01C1ED33.9F58DA80
>		Content-Type: text/html;
>		        charset="iso-8859-1"
>		Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>		
>		<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0
>Transitional//EN">
>		This is a well-written report based on = lots of=20
>discussions with businesses and others.  Not too long, and brings = in a
>lot=20 of broad perspectives.  Of course the answer to "What is clean =
>technology?"=20 is, "Well it depends...."  The report attempts to categorize
>clean = tech=20 based on some good criteria.
>		 
>		The report can be downloaded = from
>		http://www.cleanedge.co= m/reports-gbn.php
>		 
>		There are several other interesting = reports=20 available
>there too.
>		 
>		Burt Hamner
>		www.cleanerproduction.com
>		
>		------=_NextPart_000_016D_01C1ED33.9F58DA80--
>
>	------------------------------
>	Jini Cook
>	List Manager
>	listman@wmrc.uiuc.edu
>	217.244-6553     jcook@wmrc.uiuc.edu 
>
>

THE GREENLIST BULLETIN 04/19/02
This is the bulletin of the Technology Health and Environment 
Library at TURI, reporting weekly a selection of recently 
published titles we have acquired. We hope this is a welcome 
message. Our pledge to you is to keep the bulletin relevant 
to your work and brief -- no more than 10 titles. (usually)
Please let me know if you wish to be removed from this service.

The following is not a comprehensive search result.  
Please do an online search at http://www.turi.org/greenlist for 
greater topic coverage. You are welcome to send a message to
<Mary_vidal@uml.edu> if you would like more information. Also, 
please tell us what topics you are particularly interested in 
monitoring, and who else should see GREENLIST. 
****************************************************************
Titles here, abstracts below them
1. Environmental Citizenship in Multinational Corporations:
Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development, 1999
2. Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Sustainability Strategies:
The Case of Walden Paddlers, Inc., 1999
3. Helping Boards Change Course, 1999
4. Industrial Symbiosis: A Multi?Firm Approach to Sustainability, 1999
5. Information Technology in Sustainable Development, 1999
6. Measuring Progress Towards Sustainability Principles,
Process, and Best Practices, 1999
7. Moving from Waste Management to Environmental
Management: 20 Years of Evolving Sustainability at Novo
Nordisk BioChem, 1999
8. Patagonia First Assents: Finding the Way Toward Quality of
Life and Work, 1999
9. National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental
Chemicals, 1999
10. The Struggle for Ecological Democracy: Environmental
Justice Movements in the United States, 1998


1. TITLE: Environmental Citizenship in Multinational Corporations:
Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development
AUTHOR: Rondinelli, Dennis A.; Berry, Michael A.
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting, The
Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: Over the past decade the concept of sustainable
development has expanded to include the simultaneous consideration
of economic growth, environmental protection, and social equity in
business planning and decision?making. Many multinational enterprises
engage in corporate citizenship programs to promote sustainable
development. Corporate citizenship programs are often defined
narrowly, however, as philanthropy or external relationships with
stakeholders to address social problems. As important as these
activities are, they do not adequately define the broad range of
substantive internal environmental management practices that MNCs 
also use to pursue sustainable development objectives. A content 
analysis of 38 MNCs' environmental performance reports identifies 
and classifies their practices in the field of environmental 
citizenship and their contributions to sustainable development, 
assesses the means by which MNCs collaborate with stakeholders 
in solving environmental problems, and examines the factors that 
contribute to the success of corporate environmental citizenship 
for sustainable development.

2. TITLE: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Sustainability Strategies:
The Case of Walden Paddlers, Inc.
AUTHOR: Farrow, Paul; Johnson, Richard R.; Larson, Andrea L.
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting,
The Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: This paper presents an approach to improve sustainable
decision-making in entrepreneurial start-ups with limited resources.
The case of Walden Paddlers is used to show how a simple,
inexpensive guide to evaluate decisions against a parameter of
environmental responsibility can yield quick innovations and
economic, strategic as well as environmental advantage. Factors
contributing to the success of the decision guide at Walden are
explored, with generalizable learnings discussed. In recognition 
for its innovations in plastics recycling, Walden Paddlers was 
 awarded the National Recycling Coalition's 1997 Annual Award for
Outstanding Product Innovation.

3. TITLE: Helping Boards Change Course
AUTHOR Elkington, John; Terry, Virginia; Zollinger, Peter
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting, The
Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: The coming years will see a growing focus on the roles of
chief executive officers (CEOs), chief financial officers (CFOs), boards
and the financial markets they try to satisfy in the sustainability
transition.
This paper spotlights the evolving triple bottom line (TBL) agenda for
corporations and their boards, and considers how the sustainable
development community can help ease the process for business leaders.
It accepts the analysis of pessimistic observers like David Korten, who
argue that corporations are better placed to take over the world than
they are to run it sustainably once in control. But it also underscores 
the growing - and necessary  convergence between the sustainable
development and corporate agendas, raising a number of research
questions that must be tackled in the first decade of the 21st century.
It calls for business leaders to join the push for improved systems
of global governance. Finally, it ends by sketching out some related
research areas for the next 2-3 years. Work undertaken by Sustainability
for the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) suggests that
board-level awareness is growing.
But why are CEOs and the boards of major corporations getting
involved with the sustainable development agenda? Surely the CEO
agenda is focused on more important things, like top management
organization, corporate portfolio strategy, corporate finance, mergers
and acquisitions, shareholder relations, corporate governance,
government relations and risk management? The answer, of course, is
that TBL concerns and priorities should cut across all of these areas 
of top management interest and responsibility. The center of gravity of the 
sustainable business debate is in the process of shifting from public
relations to competitive advantage and corporate governance - and, in 
the process, from factory fence to the boardroom.  We need to study the
drivers, attitudes, values, behaviors and incentive systems that help turn
abstract principles into significant on-the-ground performance improvements.

4. TITLE: Industrial Symbiosis: A Multi-Firm Approach to Sustainability
AUTHOR: Chertow, Marian R.
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting, The
Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: The emerging field of industrial ecology, sometimes
called "the science of sustainability," demands resolute attention to
the flow of materials and energy through local, regional, and global
economies. The part of industrial ecology known as industrial
symbiosis engages traditionally separate industries in a collective
approach to competitive advantage involving physical exchange of
materials, energy, water, and by-products. The keys to industrial
symbiosis are collaboration and the synergistic possibilities offered by
geographic proximity. The model of industrial symbiosis was first fully
realized in Kalundborg, Denmark. The primary partners in Kalundborg,
an oil refinery, power station, gypsum board facility, pharmaceutical
plant, and the city of Kalundborg, literally share ground water, surface
water and waste water, steam and electricity, and also exchange a
variety of wastes that become feedstocks in other processes. High levels
of environmental and economic efficiency have been achieved and have
led to many other less tangible benefits involving personnel, equipment
and information sharing. In light of Kalundborg's success, faculty
teaching industrial ecology coursework at the Yale School of Forestry
and Environmental Studies decided to explore the process, practice and
potential of industrial symbiosis more closely. Since the spring of
1997, eighteen field projects have been conducted by Yale graduate student
teams involving materials exchange at varying scopes and scales. The
studies were organized to test the tractability of a taxonomy of five
different material exchange types: 1) through waste exchanges 2)within
a facility, firm or organization 3) among firms co-located in a defined
eco?industrial park 4) among local firms that are not co-located
5) among firms organized "virtually" across a broader region. Materials
budgeting, streamlined life cycle assessment, and input-output matching
proved to be useful tools to the study teams. Key approaches hinged on
whether the team was working with new or existing operations and the
extent to which material flow decisions or business decisions were
dominant. Issues raised concerned the appropriate scale of industrial
symbiosis; whether industrial ecology encouraged waste creation at the
expense of pollution prevention and eco-efficiency; the relevance of
cluster theory to industrial symbiosis; and industrial symbiosis and
development. The most significant finding of the research was the
importance of evolutionary approaches to industrial symbiosis since
creating the level of cooperation needed for multi-party exchange is a
slow process. Three evolutionary approaches are offered as a way to
propel industrial symbiosis forward.

5. TITLE: Information Technology in Sustainable Development
AUTHOR: Sheats, James R.
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting, The
Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: The role of information technology in achieving a
sustainable economy for the planet is discussed. The fundamental
concern is considered to be ecosystem stress, with the specific, most
immediate threats being in seven areas: 1) global warming due
principally to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emission, 2) problems
associated with growing food, 3) water supply and effects of diversions,
4) fisheries depletion, 5) deforestation, 6) mining, and 7) biodiversity
reduction due to habitat loss. Based on an analysis of environmental
impact as a function of population, standard of living, and
technological basis, it is calculated that current demographic and
sociological trends that are unlikely to be reversed will lead, over
roughly the next twenty to forty years, to a ten-fold increase in impact
unless technologies are dramatically changed. It is emphasized that the
necessary changes cannot be supplied by any combination of waste
reduction, efficiency increases, and recycling or reuse technologies.
Fundamental changes are required in the way that customer demands are
satisfied, and these changes will come from both new technologies and
new business models for supplying them. Information technology is
defined here as including computers and their peripherals,
communications systems, and the means by which digital information is
acquired and used (sensors, and instruments and machines that can be
directly electronically controlled). It will be an essential component
of the solutions that humanity will increasingly demand during the next
two decades in order to keep global standards of living rising while
avoiding ecological catastrophes. This paper discusses several examples
in the areas of energy efficiency, transportation, remote sensing,
information display, and manufacturing. It then introduces the projects
underway at HP Labs that are either a direct output of the
Sustainability Initiative, or are supported by it, and concludes with 
a few observations concerning some of the organizational and business
issues that must be kept in mind as this effort develops.

6. TITLE: Measuring Progress Towards Sustainability Principles,
Process, and Best Practices
AUTHOR: Fiksel, Joseph; McDaniel, Jeff; Mendenhall, Catherine
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting, The
Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: A number of leading companies in the US, Europe and
Japan have made a commitment to become sustainable enterprises, and
have launched proactive programs to improve the environmental and
social performance of their products, processes, services, and
facilities. However, one of the key challenges faced by these companies is
how to track their progress towards sustainability and communicate it to
both employees and other important stakeholders. This paper is intended to
assist business decision-makers who wish to initiate continuous
measurement and improvement of their "triple bottom line," i.e., the
economic, environmental, and societal performance of their products,
facilities, and enterprise. First, a set of guiding principles is
presented, suggesting that performance measurement should: 1) focus on both
resource and value indicators, 2) explicitly represent the triple bottom
line, 3) consider the full product life cycle, and 4) combine both
leading and lagging indicators. Next, a comprehensive performance
measurement process is described, including specific steps for planning,
implementation, and review, based upon established practices within
the business community. Finally, examples are given of five
well-known companies that are recognized leaders in the field of
sustainability measurement. The intent of this paper is to provide both
a conceptual understanding of the state of the art, and a survey of best
practices across several industries, thus creating a pragmatic
foundation for establishing a customized sustainability measurement process
within any company. The paper is based upon Battelle's experience in
developing and implementing performance measurement processes for a
variety of industrial clients, including several leaders in the
sustainability movement. In particular, the performance measurement process
is based on the results of a multi-year program sponsored by the Electric
Power Research Institute (EPRI). 

7. TITLE: Moving from Waste Management to Environmental
Management: 20 Years of Evolving Sustainability at Novo
Nordisk BioChem
AUTHOR: Stadelman, Steve A.; Rehder, Paul
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting, The
Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: Novo Nordisk BioChem of North America (NNBNA) is
the North American enzyme production facility of Novo Nordisk A/S.
The NNBNA facility started operation in 1979 in Franklinton, NC and
produces food and technical grade enzymes by microbial fermentation.
The facility was intentionally located in a rural area to allow
production wastes to be stabilized and agronomically recycled.  In the 
past 20 years, the facility has experienced the rapid pace of changing
regulations in the 1980's and has focused on pollution prevention and
standardized environmental management in the 1990's. Through all of these
changes, NNBNA has remained a good example of sustainable development. 
Environmental management has evolved with facility growth and 
regulatory changes into a large scale operation affecting thousands 
of acres and several hundred landowners. The management focus has 
also grown to include a strong customer service orientation with an
emphasis on building a sustainable partnership with farm owners and 
other stakeholders.  NNBNA has recruited management personnel with
technical expertise in agricultural and environmental areas in order to
meet growing demands of landowners and regulatory and public 
stakeholders.  Novo Nordisk has adopted the International Chamber of
Commerce Charter for Sustainability and is pursuing ISO 14001 certification
at several facilities. NNBNA is participating in the US EPA ISO 14001 pilot
study of environmental management systems and is pursuing certification.
NNBNA has a strong relationship with NC State Universtiy which has evolved
to include current research projects that focus on the future
sustainability of waste recycling operations. 

8. TITLE: Patagonia First Assents: Finding the Way Toward Quality of
Life and Work
AUTHOR: Harward, Randy; Rowledge, Lorinda R.
SOURCE: Sustainability: Ways of Knowing/Ways of Acting, The
Eighth International Greening of Industry Network Conference,
1999, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ABSTRACT: This in-depth Case Example of Patagonia's pioneering
environmental work follows Patagonia's 30 year history of concern for
the environment, highlighting their more recent focus on aggressively
integrating environmental considerations into business strategies,
products and processes.

9. TITLE: National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental
Chemicals
SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
ABSTRACT: The National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental 
Chemicals is a new publication that provides an ongoing assessment 
for the US population's exposure to environmental chemicals using
biomonitoring. For this report, an environmental chemical meansa 
chemical compound or chemical element present in air, water, soil,
dust, or other environmental media. Biomonitoring is the assessment 
of human exposure to chemicals by measuring the chemicals or their
metabolites in human specimens, such as blood or urine. This report
presents data for the non-institutionalized, civilian US population for
1999 from CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
(NHANES). NHANES is a series of surveys designed to collect data on
the health and nutritional status of the US population. The report
includes data for exposure to the general population of 1) metals: lead
uranium, cesium, tungsten, mercury, antimony, molybdenum, cadmium,
barium, platinum, cobalt, beryllium, and thallium; 2) tobacco smoke:
cotinine; 3) organophosphate pesticides: urine metabolites of 28
pesticides, including chlorpyrifos, diazinon, fenthion, malathion,
parathion, disulfoton, phosmet, phorate, temephos, and methyl parathion,
and; 4) phthalates.

10. TITLE: The Struggle for Ecological Democracy: Environmental
Justice Movements in the United States
AUTHOR: Faber, Daniel
SOURCE: Guilford Press,1998
ABSTRACT: A new wave of grassroots environmentalism is building
in the United States. Groups that have traditionally been at the
periphery of mainstream environmentalism ? poor people, working 
people, and people of color  are fusing the fight for a healthy
environment with historical struggles for civil rights and social 
justice. This timely book brings together leading scholars and 
activists to provide an ecosocialist perspective on the goals, 
strategies, and accomplishments of the environmental justice movement, 
and to explore the emerging principles of ecological democracy that
undergird it.





Janet Clark <clarkjan@turi.org>
Associate Director for Information
MA Toxics Use Reduction Institute
University of Massachusetts
One University Ave.
Lowell, MA  01854-2866
Tel 978-934-3346, Fax 978-934-3050
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