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Re: Fuel Blending



I feel that this reply is a little over the top.  Whether pollutants are created depends greatly on the solvents and contaminants involved, with alcohols, MEK and the like burning very cleanly.  If the solvent is used for degreasing, there is a possibility that the burning could be as clean as the burning of odorized natural gas.  Dioxins of concern are produced only in the presence of chlorine!  Formation of PICs, including PAHs, depends upon the molecular weight and other characteristics of the solvent and contaminants and may not be produced with lighter or oxygenated solvents.  Whether metals will be emitted depends upon the temperature of combustion and the volatility of the metal present.
 
The reply presumes that incineration is the result and that "many" pollutants will be produced.  However, burning for energy recovery can be a very good reuse of many solvents.  It is particularly appropriate when it displaces the burning of low-grade oil or coal.  Burning the latter results in mercury, uranium and uranium-daughter products in the combustion gases, unless these are removed by expensive technology.  Burning the former usually results in SOx emissions.
 
Ralph E. Cooper, Ph.D.
Mediator, Attorney & Counselor at Law
9901 IH-10 West, Suite 800
San Antonio, TX 78230
210.558-0555
----- Original Message -----
From: "Kelly D. Moran" <kmoran@tdcenvironmental.com>
To: <Christovoru.Nicolaus@upm-kymmene.com>; "p2tech" <p2tech@great-lakes.net>
Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2002 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: Fuel Blending

> This would be hazardous waste incineration, which creates many
> pollutants and usually some solid waste (ash).  The emissions may
> include dioxins, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and other products of
> incomplete combustion.  (In contrast, natural gas creates few of these
> emissions--it is very clean burning).  If there are metals in your waste
> solvent, they will probably mostly be emitted. 
>
> In the U.S. this activity would normally require a hazardous waste
> treatment permit, a permit under the Clean Air Act, and possibly other
> permits.  On a an operational level, you can assume that you will need
> to greatly increase maintenance for the natural gas burner.
>
> I'd encourage you to seek to find a way to reuse the solvent or to
> substitute a less hazardous solvent instead of burning the solvent
> waste.
>
> Kelly Moran
> TDC Environmental
>
>
Christovoru.Nicolaus@upm-kymmene.com wrote:
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> > My supervisor is thinking about substituting the natural gas to our waste
> > solvent (in liquid form), since they produce high BTU, for our oxidizer. I
> > would like to know if you guys know anything about the process. If you
> > could share your experience regarding the issue, that would be great.
> >
> >    What kind of equipment does it require?
> >    Is it doable?
> >    Who produces it?
> >    How the process would look like?
> >    It will reduce gas consumption, however, how about the VOC emission?
> >    I know cement kiln uses fuel blending, how does it work?
> >
> > Thanks, Chris
> >
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