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Re: Fuel Blending



Not sure where you're writing from, Christovoru, or what the
regulations are there. Here in the United States, only companies that
are licensed as hazardous waste "treatment, storage or disposal
facilities" may burn waste flammable solvent. Becoming such a
facility here is very expensive and very time consuming. Only a rare
firm is willing to make the effort and spend the money to do so. Were
that firm to then make a mistake, they would be subject to severe
liabilities including citizen lawsuits and fines by the US
Environmental Protection Agency.

Thus, my first piece of advice is to check the regulatory
requirements to make sure you will not be in violation of them. Even
if there are none, you need to consider the politics in your
community were you to experience a serious incident. Would the
citizens castigate your company the way the citizens of Bhoupal,
India did with Union Carbide?

If at this point you still want to proceed, you will want to purchase
equipment that is specifically designed for the application. Because
most waste solvents are much more flammable than the fuel they are
replacing, safety needs to be a primary concern. You will also need a
system to filter out the suspended contaminants as they could foul
the burn nozzle. Were that to happen, the air-to-fuel ratio would
become too lean, creating air pollution (i.e. incomplete combustion).
The system would need to provide a specific minimum residence time at
higher than the design operating temperature (I don't know the
specifications, but they might look something like "residence time of
at least 2 seconds at 2100 F) to ensure complete combustion.
Otherwise you would need an afterburner, probably fired by natural
gas to control air pollution (you might need to anyhow depending on
the applicable air quality regulations).

Systems that meet all of these criteria are quite expensive.

Hope this is helpful.

Warren



>Hi all,
>
>My supervisor is thinking about substituting the natural gas to our waste
>solvent (in liquid form), since they produce high BTU, for our oxidizer. I
>would like to know if you guys know anything about the process. If you
>could share your experience regarding the issue, that would be great.
>
>    What kind of equipment does it require?
>    Is it doable?
>    Who produces it?
>    How the process would look like?
>    It will reduce gas consumption, however, how about the VOC emission?
>    I know cement kiln uses fuel blending, how does it work?
>
>Thanks, Chris
>
>
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