[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

RE: permitting fuel cell technology



The current fuel cell technology can use several fuels to operate.  I have
never seen a discussion of pollutants from the various fuel sources.

The most desirable fuel is hydrogen which is the most efficient and
cleanest.  Probably most commercial installations will use hydrogen and
oxygen.  If oxygen is obtained from normal air then the nitrogen content
might contribute to the generation of some NOx.  This would depend on the
combustion temperature and conditions.

Another fuel source commonly discussed is methane or natural gas.  This is a
potentially prominant fuel source because of the availability.  Propane may
also fall into this group.  Residential and automotive uses are looking this
way due to the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure.  If using natural gas or
propane, then the purity of these fuels would determine what pollutants
would be present.  You will have some CO2 generation from the carbon present
in both of these fuels.  You could have some SOx formed due to sulfur
impurities in these commercial fuels although usually in the 0.05% or less
sulfur levels.  Again combustion in the presence of nitrogen from the air
might contribute NOx.

In a pure sense, fuel cells would generate only water vapor and energy if
using pure hydrogen and pure oxygen.  In most any case, I believe fuel cells
are still more efficient and less polluting than other combustion generated
electrical energy sources now in use.

Dale H. Francke, P.E.
Engineering Service Professionals, Inc.
772.486.3909
Fax: 509.756.3985
e-mail:   dale@espsupport.com


Professional Engineer - State of FL

Visit us at:   www.espsupport.com


-----Original Message-----
From: owner-p2tech@great-lakes.net
[mailto:owner-p2tech@great-lakes.net]On Behalf Of Wendy Fitzner
Sent: Monday, August 05, 2002 10:16 AM
To: p2tech@great-lakes.net
Subject: permitting fuel cell technology


This may be on the fringe of P2, but does anyone have any information on
permitting issues associated with fuel cell technology?  I am
particularly interested if there are any air permit issues that have
been addressed, recognizing that this may be one new technology that
wouldn't result in air pollution...or would it?  I'm looking at fuel
cells providing energy to an individual facility or complex as well as
issues associated with putting together a fuel cell infrastructure.

I'm on a rush schedule so any quick responses are appreciated!
Thanks.

Wendy

Wendy Fitzner, Supervisor
P2 Program Management Unit
Environmental Assistance Division
Department of Environmental Quality
525 West Allegan
P.O. Box 30457
Lansing, Michigan 48909-7957

phone:  517-373-8798
fax:       517-241-0858
fitznerw@michigan.gov


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
p2tech is hosted by the Great Lakes Information Network:
http://www.great-lakes.net
To unsubscribe from this list: send mail to majordomo@great-lakes.net
with the command 'unsubscribe p2tech' in the body of your message. No
quotes or subject line are required.
About : http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/p2tech/p2tech.info
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *



* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
p2tech is hosted by the Great Lakes Information Network:
http://www.great-lakes.net
To unsubscribe from this list: send mail to majordomo@great-lakes.net
with the command 'unsubscribe p2tech' in the body of your message. No
quotes or subject line are required.
About : http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/p2tech/p2tech.info
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *