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Spontaneous Combustion of Paint Booth Filters



Based on research conducted through the IWRC's Small Business Pollution
Prevention Center, the finding of our investigation on Spontaneous
Combustion of Waste Paint Booth Filters is now available. This
laboratory research project endeavored to identify the cause of
spontaneous combustion of used paint booth filters. The problem plagues
some paint shops. The experiment was conducted by Combustion Science &
Engineering, Inc. (www.csefire.com). The full report and a summary of
waste management recommendations can be viewed at:

http://www.iwrc.org/programs/sponCombust.cfm

Practices to consider to minimize the potential for spontaneous
combustion of used paint booth filters:

Avoid disposing of waste paint booth filters in commercial dumpsters
where the filters can be compressed and insulated by other combustible
wastes. This is especially true of mechanical or hydraulic compaction
dumpsters.

Avoid disposing of waste paint booth filters in trash bags that are
picked up by
compactor-type garbage trucks.

Used small metal trash containers, such as 55-gallon drums, to store
filters
prior to disposal and do not compress the filters significantly.

Keep waste paint booth filter storage containers at as cool an ambient
temperature as possible (i.e., locate in shade or in cooler places
within buildings) as higher ambient storage temperatures increase the
probability of a fire dramatically.

Use low volatile organic compound (VOC) paints.

My apology for cross posting,
Sue Schauls
SBPPC Program Manager






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