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E2 Training for NPPR



> Last springs survey of NPPR conference attendees showed that the need for more information on energy assistance was second only to the need for more information on P2. The P2/Energy work group has been working with DOE to obtain training the day before (April  7th) our conference in Louisville, KY. 
> 
> The goal is to provide attendees with energy efficiency tools they can use with their first P2 site visit after they return home. Using DOE Best Practices Assistance Tools are well designed to add value and impact for P2 site visits without requiring more staff. There are four types of training to choose from, and we need to know which one you would prefer. Please vote and return your preference to me kenneth.brown@moea.state.mn.us.
> 
> Which would you prefer? Descriptions are provided below.
>    Manufacturing Process Heating
>    Compressed Air
>    Motors
>    Steam
> 
> ***Best Practices in Process Heating***
> 
> Process heating is vital to nearly all manufacturing processes, supplying heat to produce materials and products. Heating processes consume about 5.2 quadrillion Btu of energy annually, which accounts for nearly 17 percent of all industrial energy use. Advanced technologies and operating practices offer significant savings opportunities in process heating, with the potential to reduce energy consumption an additional 5 to 25 percent in the next decade. 
> 
> This one-day training course includes an introduction to process heating and process heating equipment such as furnaces, dryers, ovens, heaters, kilns etc. used by the industry. The course includes information on heating methods, heat transfer in furnaces, waste heat recovery, commonly used process heating controls and emissions from heating processes. The course highlights the use of the Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST), that can be used to survey furnaces and heaters, identify major energy using equipment, prioritize improvement opportunities, and assess available methods that can be used to improve thermal efficiency in an industrial plant. 
> 
> What will you learn?
> Available methods to reduce fuel use and costs, improve energy efficiency, and reduce emissions from furnaces; Practical tips on the plant energy efficiency improvement through use of operations and maintenance (O&M) procedures; Introduction to a tool (PHAST) that can be used to survey process heating equipment and to identify major energy consuming equipment; How to use the PHAST tool to assess energy consumption in furnaces and to reduce energy use for a furnace and its components; This tool includes information on specific areas of possible improvements, available methods to reduce energy consumption, magnitude of potential improvements and available resources for help.
> 
> 
> ***Best Practices in Compressed Air Systems***
> 
> In the U.S., compressed air systems account for $1.5 billion per year in energy costs, and
> 0.5 percent of emissions. Many industries use compressed air systems as power sources for tools and equipment used for pressurizing, atomizing, agitating, and mixing applications. Optimization of compressed air systems can provide energy efficiency improvements of 20 to 50 percent.
> 
> This one day training provides an assortment of tools and resources to help industrial end users achieve efficiency improvements and related cost savings. The following topics are covered during the training:
> Determine the Cost of Compressed Air for Your Plant; Assessing Compressed Air Needs; Inappropriate Uses of Compressed Air; Compressed Air System Audits; Pressure Drop & Controlling System Pressure; Maint. of CA Systems for Peak Performance; Compressed Air System Controls; Compressed Air System Leaks; Packaged Compressor Efficiency Ratings; Compressed Air System Economics; Heat Recovery with Compressed Air Systems; and Proven opportunities at the Component Level; and use of the Pump System Assessment Tool (PSAT) Downloadable Software.> 
> 
> The Pumping System Assessment Software Tool helps industrial users assess the efficiency of pumping system operations. PSAT uses achievable pump performance data from Hydraulic Institute standards and motor performance data from the MotorMaster+ database to calculate potential energy and associated cost savings.
> 
> 
> ***Best Practices for Motor-driven Equipment***
> 
> Motor-driven equipment accounts for 64 percent of the electricity consumed in the U.S. industrial sector. The following topics are covered during the training:> 
> Optimizing Electric Motor Systems; Motor System Upgrades; Eliminating Voltage Unbalance;
> Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing; Replace V-Belts with Cogged or Synchronous Belt Drives; Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench; Improving Ventilation System Energy Efficiency; Improving Liquids Pump System Performance; and use of MotorMaster+ 3.0 Downloadable Software Tool.
> 
> The MotorMaster+ 3.0 Software Tool includes a catalog of over 20,000 AC motors. Version 3.0 features motor inventory management tools, maintenance log tracking, efficiency analysis, savings evaluation, energy accounting, and environmental reporting capabilities.
> 
> 
> 
> ***Best Practices Steam Generation***
> 
> Over 45% of all the fuel burned by U.S. manufacturers is consumed to raise steam. Steam is used to heat raw materials and treat semi-finished products. It is also a power source for equipment, as well as for building heat and electricity generation. Approximately $18 billion (1997 dollars) annually to feed the boilers generating the steam.
> 
> Many manufacturing facilities can recapture through the installation of more efficient steam equipment and processes. A typical industrial facility can realize steam savings of 20% by improving their steam system. If steam system improvements were adopted industry-wide, the benefits would be $4.0 billion in fuel cost reductions and 32 million metric tons of emission reductions. Examples of opportunities for savings covered during the training include:
> Steam Generation through cogeneration applications, boiler controls, and water treatment; Steam Distribution through checking steam leaks, installing insulation and proper steam trap maintenance; Steam End Use through heat exchanger maintenance; Steam Recovery through condensate return; and use of the Steam System Scoping Tool. The Steam System Scoping Tool provides a structure where by users can identify the most cost effective opportunities for improvement.
> 
> ***
> Ken Brown
> Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance
> Pollution Prevention Team Leader
> 520 Lafayette Road North
> St. Paul, MN 55155
> dir ph 651-215-0241
> fax 651-215-0246
> kenneth.brown@moea.state.mn.us
> http://www.moea.state.mn.us
> 
> 

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