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Re: level of effort for mass balance?



Maybe we have some engineers in government as well.  The RCRA reauthorization in the USA was going to require every facility with compliance issues in the USA to conduct a mass balance.  Fortunately, the National Academy of Engineers recommended against this (aren't they engineers?).  The Cleaner Production Centers UNIDO P2 protocol requires mass balance.  Burt talked about a government agency wanting to require mass balance in a program.  For the record, this is not "materials balance."  This was the point that I raised.  I think we are confusing these terms and the level of effort required to make the proper measurements. 

Bob Pojasek

Hi P2techies,

Thanks Melinda for the clarification of terms "mass" vs "materials" balance.  We have to help engineers we are training to relax a bit when they first hear about materials balance requirements in the Massachusetts program.  Burt's estimate is really pretty good, with more time needed to characterize the process for an external consultant new to the company or an EHS officer.  The three days certainly allows time to confirm the process diagram on the shop floor.  This is a key step in the planning requirement in this state because of discovery or materials, water, and energy lost -- and a loose but pretty good quantification of that loss.  It is highly motivating.

Janet Clark
Toxics Use Reduction Institute
University of Massachusetts
One University Ave
Lowell, MA 0`854-2866
Tel 978-934-3346, Fax 978-934-3050
http://www.turi.org
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