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Spent caustic solution



Greeting fellow Technical Assistance Providers:

Can you help provide resources for one of my clients?  Here is their
situation:

We generate a waste sodium hydroxide solution (20% wt) from the aluminum
chemical milling process.  The solution also contains dissolved aluminum
(5-10% wt) and a small percentage of sodium sulfide.  Under normal
circumstances, this solution is sold to a vendor for a nominal fee to used
as a direct ingredient in their manufacturing process.  Because the spent
caustic is a direct substitute for a commercially available material, it is
not  a solid waste, and therefore, not subject to RCRA regulation.
the vendor has altered their specifications for accepting this type of
material and it our spent material is not always accepted,  as in the past.
Because of this, we have been researching other avenues for
recycling/reusing the spent caustic solution.  We have learned that there
are municipal waste water treatment plants that want this type of material
because it is a direct substitute for a commercially available product.
With all of this in mind:

-    Are there other waste water plants (public or private) in Wichita, the
region or state that may use this type of material in their process?

Thank you, please respond directly to me at nlarson@ksu.edu

Nancy J. Larson, RS
Industrial Pollution Prevention Specialist
KSU Pollution Prevention Institute
7001 West 21st Street North
Wichita, KS 67205
316/722-7721 ext.254
800/578-8898
www.sbeap.org
NLarson@ksu.edu


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