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Examples of P2 and occupational health integration




Hello,
I have been involved in a few exciting projects in New England and New Jersey
that promote the integration of occupational and environmental health -
particularly by encouraging the use of P2 as a way to get companies to consider
worker safety and health at the same time as environmental health when making P2
decisions.  By doing this, risk is not shifted to the work environment.  Such
projects include a P2 training program for workers (in a joint management/labor
committee setting), the development of tools used in hospitals that address both
worker safety and health issues and environmental risk simultaneously, and a
computer program that offers P2 advisors to assist the user in determining the
hazards of  existing processes and chemistries compared with safer, cleaner, and
cheaper alternatives.

I am presenting a summary of the work that's been done in this field at the
upcoming NPPR conference in the "Labor and P2" session, and wonder if anyone
knows of other similar projects that I can share with the participants of the
session next week.  We hope to open discussion on this topic and learn of other
work in this field.
For additional information on past conference presentations and papers written
on this topic, please visit the Toxics Use Reduction Institute's Website at
http://www.turi.org/business/health.htm.

Thank you!
Karla Armenti, ScD.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
University of New Hampshire

Principal, COES, LLC.
Consulting in Occupational & Environmental Sciences
(603) 472-8721


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