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RE: RE: Bathroom Fixture Recycling



Title: Message
This listserver occasionally provides me with that gem of humor to get me through a long afternoon (thank you, Scott!).
 
Bob is thinking of a wonderful award-winning junk store called:   
 
The Rebuilding Center of Our United Villages
(503) 331-1877, (503) 539-6106
3625 N. Mississippi Ave.,
Portland, Oregon
 
Portland's regional government, Metro, has a section of their website dedicated to recycling and waste prevention.  They have a Construction Industry Recycling Toolkit that includes information on deconstruction services. 
 
http://www.metro-region.org/pssp.cfm?ProgServID=24
 
I don't know whether these local resources will be able to help Julie, but thought I'd clarify Bob's suggestion. 
 
FYI,
Marianne Fitzgerald
Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality
Air Quality Division
811 SW Sixth Avenue
Portland, OR   97204
phone (503) 229-5946
fax (503) 229-5675
fitzgerald.marianne@deq.state.or.us
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Pojasek [mailto:rpojasek@sprynet.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 2:31 PM
To: p2tech@great-lakes.net
Subject: Fwd: RE: Bathroom Fixture Recycling

On of my clients makes toilets (in Romania).  They grind their rejects and use them to make new toilets.  I know that many hotels are using reground bottles to replace the sand in the smoking canisters and saving a lot of money.  They also use it as aggregate in cement and cold patch to repair the parking lots.  I hear there are other uses for the coarse sand.  I would suggest that you find some ready-mix concrete supplier in town and ask them if they sell "flowable fill."  This is a pozzalanic cement used to fill trenches with absolutely no subsidence.  They will pay to get the ground material.  But remember that it will take a lot of energy (and create a lot of noise) to grind this material.

In Portland, Oregon there is a store called the "RE-Store."  They take materials from build-outs and resell them.  It is a great place.  There are other cities in the Pacific Northwest that have them and they have a network with other stores like this from around the country.  I am sure they are in the Yahoo yellow pages.

There are many salvage yards that will take the fixtures for recycling.  This should not be a problem.

Bob Pojasek


I'd suggest Habitat for Humanity as a possible outlet.  I also heard that Hampton Roads VA did a swap out program and faced a disposal problem.  I understand they ground them up into aggregate and used them to seed Oyster beds where they worked fantastically.  I don't have a contact in Hampton Roads but let me know if you want me to see what else I can find out.
John Calcagni
-----Original Message-----
From: Julie Sieving [mailto:jsieving@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 4:37 PM
To: p2tech@great-lakes.net
Subject: Bathroom Fixture Recycling

Hi All,
I'm currently working on a large scale water conservation project.  Potentially, this project could be upgrading a large number (thousands) of toilets and faucets - leaving all the existing units behind.  Does anyone out there know of any contacts for porcelain recycling and/or metal recyclers that would accept sink fixtures?  Any leads are greatly appreciated.
Thanks - jks

Bob

Dr. Robert B. Pojasek
Pojasek & Associates
PO Box 1333
E. Arlington, MA 02474-0071
(v) 781-641-2422
(f)  781-465-6006


http://www.Pojasek-Associates.com
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