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RE: Latex Paint Brush Wash



In a post to P2TECH, my fellow Washingtonian (and
nearly-next-door-neighbor), Ron Del Mar (Ronald_A_Del_Mar@RL.gov) asked:

> We have a paint shop that is hooked up to a septic system.  The wash 
> water the painters generate when they clean paint brushes used with 
> latex paint cannot be discharged to the septic system because the 
> septic system is only
> permitted for non-industrial, domestic type discharges.  Short of 
> drumming up the latex brush wash and finding some kind of disposal 
> facility, does anybody have any innovative ideas for how to 
> minimize/manage this waste stream.  It is not hazardous waste.  We 
> estimate that this brush wash contains about 1 oz of paint per gallon 
> of water.

Ron, while I realize this is akin to heresy on P2TECH, could it be that
this is one of those instances which suggests the use of a disposable
product?  Analysis of the typical painting tasks should be able to tell
you if the task is one appropriate for some of the low-cost, foam-type
brush applicators commonly found in home improvement stores.  Certainly
it would seem that for some tasks, the reduction in labor (cleaning
paint brushes is a lot of work!) and water usage might warrant the use
of such tools.  

just a thought...

SB
===============================
Scott Butner 
Director, ChemAlliance
c/o Pacific NW National Laboratory
PO Box 999
Richland, WA  99352
Voice: (509)-372-4946/Fax: (509) 375-2443
Website: http://www.chemalliance.org/
E-mail: scott.butner@pnl.gov 
===============================

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