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Alternatives to Lindane for Lice and Scabies Treatment



As part of our Purchasing for Pollution Prevention program, INFORM has posted a series of fact
sheets on our web site with information on switching from lindane to less toxic alternatives for
lice and scabies treatment. Lindane, a persistent bioaccumulative toxic substance (PBT), is
frequently used as a prescription treatment for lice and scabies.

Use of lindane (gamma hexachlorocyclohexane) is banned in many countries around the world because of
its potential to build up in the environment and living things. The governments of Canada, Mexico
and the United States have recently begun meeting to consider whether the use of lindane should be
further restricted in North America. Lindane is still widely used in the US, particularly in
institutions, for lice and scabies treatment. 

INFORM's fact sheets explore lindane's toxic characteristics, recommend alternative control and
treatment methods, and review the risks associated with alternative lice and scabies treatments.
They may be of particular interest to staff at prisons, hospitals, schools, and other facilities
where lice and scabies infestations are common.

The lindane fact sheets may be accessed directly at
http://www.informinc.org/fact_P3lindane_treatments.php

If you need more information about lindane or have comments on the fact sheets, please email me
directly at Sutherland@informinc.org.

Lara Sutherland
Senior Research Associate
INFORM, Inc.
Phone: 303-377-7048
Fax: 303-377-7049
Sutherland@INFORMinc.org
http://www.informinc.org/p3_00.php

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