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RE: alternatives to lead in autobody work







Alice -

Thank you for sharing this very informative study.

I have two questions.

1]  In the few months since the report was published, have you found any
more specific infomration about the use of halogenated compounds in dry
paint filters?  (e.g., chlorinated or brominatred flame retardant
chemicals)

2]  Can you explain to me what the environemtnal concerns are for the
halogenated compounds in general and as they appear in used dry paint
filters?  I am not sure if it has to do with the potential for them
leaching into groundwater, the hazards of potential reaction or
combustion by-products, etc.,  and whether these concerns differs for
liquid waste (e.g., waste halogenated solvent) verus a flame retardant
coating that contains halogens.

As I started looking through the report, I was trying to guess what the
source of the halogenated compounds could be.  I never would have
thought of flame retardant chemicals before I saw it in the report.

Dave Salman

Dave Salman
Coatings and Consumer Products Group
US EPA OAQPS
Mail Code C539-03
RTP NC 27711
tel (919) 541-0859
fax (919) 541-5689
e-mail salman.dave@epa.gov







|---------+---------------------------->
|         |           "Chapman, Alice" |
|         |           <Alice.Chapman@ME|
|         |           TROKC.GOV>       |
|         |           Sent by:         |
|         |           owner-p2tech@grea|
|         |           t-lakes.net      |
|         |                            |
|         |                            |
|         |           05/25/2004 11:49 |
|         |           PM               |
|         |           Please respond to|
|         |           "Chapman, Alice" |
|         |                            |
|---------+---------------------------->
  >--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
  |                                                                                                              |
  |       To:       p2tech@great-lakes.net                                                                       |
  |       cc:       "Hickok, Dave" <Dave.Hickok@METROKC.GOV>, "Tomchick, Laurel" <Laurel.Tomchick@METROKC.GOV>   |
  |       Subject:  RE: alternatives to lead in autobody work                                                    |
  >--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|




Hello P2 Tech'ers,

Our program recently completed a study of spent autobody paint booth
arrestor filters, accessible on the web at:
http://apps01.metrokc.gov/hazwaste/publications/index.cfm#440
A prior study was completed in 1994 (unfortunately not on the web, but I
can send a copy by snail-mail to anyone interested.)  The 1994 study
tested autobody masking waste and sanding dust also, but neither
designated as hazardous waste.

In both studies for paint filters, TCLP lead did not exceed regulated
concentrations, but TCLP chromium did.  The overall concentrations of
metals in the recent study dropped quite a bit compared to the 1994
study.  For example, in 1994 46% of samples had detectable TCLP lead,
while in 2004 only 13% of samples had detectable lead.  Here's a quick
summary of chromium data:

      1994 study, 9 samples tested, TCLP chromium at 6.4 ppm in 1
      sample, the rest below regulated levels (4 not detected)
      2004 study, 39 samples tested, TCLP chromium at 10 ppm in 1
      sample, the rest Not Detected.  The shop with 10 ppm chromium was
      using a zinc chromate primer.  After switching to a chromium-free
      primer, the filters passed TCLP
Based on these study results, the Waste Characterization programs of
Public Health - Seattle & King County and the Kitsap County Health
District no longer require TCLP metal testing for all autobody paint
booth filters being considered for disposal to the garbage.  Testing is
only required if the shop is using a zinc chromate primer or other
heavy-metal bearing paint (shops requesting clearance to put filters in
the garbage have to check paint ingredients).

The real hot topic of the 2004 study was the presence of halogenated
organic compounds (HOCs) at widely varying concentrations in paint booth
filters.  HOCs are state-regulated dangerous waste in Washington.

Hope this sheds some light on your question.  It appears that paint &
auto manufacturers have already made strides toward reducing heavy
metals such as chromium and lead.



Alice I. Chapman, PE
Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County
130 Nickerson St, Suite 100
Seattle, WA  98109-1658
http://www.govlink.org/hazwaste/


206-263-3058, phone
206-263-3070, fax










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