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Re: water removal





Various sizes of geotextile tubes are used for dewatering purposes. At the web site www.geotecassociates.com there are numerous photos, examples and discussion resources.
One of the photos under tests shows a suspended bag about six feet long with a drip pan underneath. (that part of the site did not display a few minutes ago).




At 09:08 AM 10/27/2004, sbd@ksu.edu wrote:
P2techers:
I'm looking for a cheap way to de-water sludge from a wet
plasma cutting process. The process generates about 2 (55gal)
drums of solids per week. When the material is removed from
the machines it's about 50% water. Can anyone recommend a
low-tech (passive) way to de-water this sludge for under $5000?
Would it be possible to just make a home-made device (the
company does metal fabrication) by building a filter device with
some sort of removable, supported-fabric filtration bucket
section (suspended inside a containment vessel), which would
catch the sludge and allow the water to drip through to a liquid
collection vessel below?
Any help or creative ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Sherry
Sherry J. Davis, CHMM
Industrial P2 Specialist
133 Ward Hall,KSU
Manhattan, KS  66506-2508
Fax: 785-532-6952
Phone: 1-800-578-8898
sbd@ksu.edu

John C. Marlin, PhD. Senior Scientist Waste Management and Research Center One Hazelwood Dr. Champaign, Il. 61820-7465

U of I mail code 676
phone: 217-333-8956 fax: 217-333-8944
jmarlin@wmrc.uiuc.edu
http://www.wmrc.uiuc.edu/
WMRC is a division of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.


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