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dental manufacturing best practices



Hello All,
A group of us recently went to Korea for p2 assessments and I have some questions related to dental prosthetics mfg. This company uses manual techniques, no computerized technology.
 
1. Is there a low cost, effective way to recycle/reuse gold and zirconium dust? They are currently collected through separate collection systems and are not pure.
2. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acid are used to etch cobalt/chromium dental plates- is there a better process for this type of etching? I think silicone plates is an alternative that would eliminate the need for etching, but need a low tech solution as well.
3. The best practices (from dental assn) for disinfecting rubber molds (blood/saliva) seems to be glutaraldehyde. Would autoclave equipment used in hospital instrument disinfection be effective or impair the rubber mold?
 
Thank you for any assistance on this topic. 
 
Sincerely,
 
Eileen Gunn
Principal, SAGE Environmental Solutions
(617)777-7002
sageEsolutions.com
 
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