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Coastal Centre concerned about plastic pollution in Lake Huron
Owen Sound Sun Times (7/17)
Everyone has a role to play in turning the tide on the growing problem of plastic pollution in the Great Lakes. That's the message from Ontario's Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation outreach specialist, who is working to educate people on simple ways to help combat the issue.

Elementary Adventure Day outing provides hands-on fun
The Ashland Daily Press (7/12)
Just over half-a-dozen youngsters gathered at the Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center, in Wisconsin, to participate in the first of this year’s three 4-H Elementary Adventure Day’s.

Summer interns help to research Lake Erie issues
The Toledo Blade (7/5)
Eleven college and university students from across the United States are studying freshwater lake issues this summer at the University of Toledo’s Lake Erie Center.

Anglers enlisted in water fight
Great Lakes Echo (6/29)
A recent study by researchers at Cornell University, in N.Y., revealed that anglers in the Great Lakes region are aware of and concerned about the threat of aquatic invasive species (AIS).

Lake State opens Sea Grant office
Sault Ste. Marie Evening News (6/29)
Lake Superior State University officially welcomed its new Michigan Sea Grant office to campus with a ribbon cutting ceremony Monday morning.

Stone Lab hosts series of experts to discuss lake
Port Clinton News Herald (6/28)
In Ohio, people looking to learn more about the issues facing Lake Erie will have several opportunities this summer to hear firsthand from the experts in the field who deal with those issues every day.

TEACH Calendar of Events
What's going on in your neighborhood this month? Meet other people and learn together at recreational and educational events! Our new dynamic calendar is updated daily with current educational events.
Great Lakes native flora

table of contents
What is flora?
Brief floral history of the Great Lakes basin
The importance of native landscaping
Native plant species of the Great Lakes region
Some resources for starting your own native plant garden
Native flora fun facts!
Take a quiz!
References

What is flora?

Click for larger
image. Flora was once known as the Roman goddess of flowers, though today we use the term to refer to plant life, including trees. We'll be focusing on vascular plants, which have specialized supporting and water-conducting tissue called xylem and phloem, and typically possess roots, stems and leaves. Nonvascular plants, such as mosses, lack an internal conducting system for water and nutrients, so they depend on their immediate surroundings for moisture.

To be considered a plant, an organism must possess certain characteristics: photosynthesis, cellulose, stationary existence and lack a nervous system.

Photosynthesis is the process by which plants transform energy from the sun into the energy they need to survive. Through photosynthesis, plants are able to convert water, carbon dioxide and minerals into oxygen and energy. Without photosynthesis, there would be little food or other organic matter on Earth; the air would be full of carbon dioxide; and most organisms, including humans, would disappear.

Click for larger image. Cellulose is the basic structural component of plant cell walls, making them rigid and "boxed" shaped. Enabling the leaves and stems of a plant to stand up straight is an important function of cellulose. Plants also lack the means to move on their own as well as a nervous system. The nervous system is a group of organized cells that allow an organism to respond to sensory impulses.

Vascular plants are classified as either gymnosperms or angiosperms. Gymnosperms, meaning "naked seed," have an exposed seed, which can also include a pinecone. Softwood trees, such as conifers, are examples of gymnosperms. Angiosperms, meaning "hidden seed," include 80 percent of the Earth's plants, including all flowering plants. The seeds of angiosperms are enclosed within fruits, often called ovaries. In addition to flowering plants, hardwood trees, such as oak, maple, hickory, birch and poplar, are classified as angiosperms.

Graphics: snow trillium (credit: USDA PLANTS database); xylem and phloem model (credit: Britannica.com)

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