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Students learn about Lake Superior at MTUís Water Festival
ABC 10 - Ishpeming, MI (10/23)
Over 1,000 students from across the Copper Country made their way to the Great Lakes Research Center on the Michigan Tech campus for the third annual Water Festival. The event is designed to offer students engaging Lake Superior-based content.

New stewardship programs aim to teach students how to care for Great Lakes
Upper Peninsula Second Wave (10/15)
The Upper Great Lakes Stewardship Institute is the newest among several regional hubs across Michigan with the goal to educate students on good environmental stewardship for the Great Lakes and their watersheds.

TEACH Calendar of Events
What's going on in your neighborhood this month? Meet other people and learn together at recreational and educational events! Our new dynamic calendar is updated daily with current educational events.
Water levels on the Great Lakes

table of contents
Introduction
Three types of water level fluctuations
History repeating itself: Hydrographs illustrate historical levels
How levels and flows are measured
Effects of lake level fluctuations
References and more information

Water levels on the Great Lakes

Click to see larger image. Water levels are part of the ebb and flow of nature.

The difference between the amount of water coming into a lake and the amount going out is the determining factor in whether the water level will rise, fall or remain stable. When several months of above-average precipitation occur with cooler, cloudy conditions that cause less evaporation, the levels gradually rise. Likewise, prolonged periods of lower-than-average precipitation and warmer temperatures typically result in lowering of water levels.

The recent decline of Great Lakes' water levels, now at lows not seen since the mid-1960s, is due mostly to evaporation during the warmer-than-usual temperatures of the past three years, a series of mild winters, and below-average snowpack in the Lake Superior basin.

Because the major factors affecting the water supply to the lakes--precipitation, evaporation and runoff--cannot be controlled or accurately predicted for more than a few weeks into the future, the influence of man-made regulation of lake levels is very limited. Nature has most of the control, adding water through snow and rain, and taking it away through evaporation.

Graphic: Lake Superior's south shore, April 2000.

Detailed Map: The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River system


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