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University of Windsor invasive species research centre closes
CBC News (5/27)
The Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species, based at the University of Windsor, is closing because it's run out of federal funding.

Stockbridge HS invention to monitor Great Lakes pest
Lansing State Journal (5/27)
In Michigan, a team of Stockbridge High School students has spent the past year designing an underwater camera to keep tabs on the state’s fight against invasive sea lampreys. Next week their invention will get its first real test.

'Once in a lifetime ' experience: Lighthouse keeper on Lake Superior
CBC News (5/19)
A group is hiring two students to serve as lighthouse keepers this summer on Porphyry Island, about 40 kilometers east of Thunder Bay, Ont.

Superior students set sail for hands-on learning about St. Louis River, Lake Superior
Wisconsin Public Radio (5/16)
Close to 1,500 students from northern Minnesota and Wisconsin set sail for a day on St. Louis River to learn about the Great Lakes, as part of the week-long St. Louis River Quest.

Tree group aims to ‘ReLeaf’ Michigan
WKAR - East Lansing, MI (5/10)
An Ann Arbor-based organization has been planting trees all over Michigan since 1988. ReLeaf Michigan helps property owners learn about trees and how to plant them, citing their numerous benefits.

Coldwater bacteria threatens Great Lakes salmon
Charlevoix Courier (5/3)
A new study shows a bacterial disease that sickens fish whether raised in captivity or in the wild is imperiling popular salmon species in the Great Lakes Basin.

TEACH Calendar of Events
What's going on in your neighborhood this month? Meet other people and learn together at recreational and educational events! Our new dynamic calendar is updated daily with current educational events.
Water levels on the Great Lakes

table of contents
Introduction
Three types of water level fluctuations
History repeating itself: Hydrographs illustrate historical levels
How levels and flows are measured
Effects of lake level fluctuations
References and more information

Water levels on the Great Lakes

Click to see larger image. Water levels are part of the ebb and flow of nature.

The difference between the amount of water coming into a lake and the amount going out is the determining factor in whether the water level will rise, fall or remain stable. When several months of above-average precipitation occur with cooler, cloudy conditions that cause less evaporation, the levels gradually rise. Likewise, prolonged periods of lower-than-average precipitation and warmer temperatures typically result in lowering of water levels.

The recent decline of Great Lakes' water levels, now at lows not seen since the mid-1960s, is due mostly to evaporation during the warmer-than-usual temperatures of the past three years, a series of mild winters, and below-average snowpack in the Lake Superior basin.

Because the major factors affecting the water supply to the lakes--precipitation, evaporation and runoff--cannot be controlled or accurately predicted for more than a few weeks into the future, the influence of man-made regulation of lake levels is very limited. Nature has most of the control, adding water through snow and rain, and taking it away through evaporation.

Graphic: Lake Superior's south shore, April 2000.

Detailed Map: The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River system


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