GLIN Daily News About GLIN
AboutEnvironmentHistory/CultureGeographyPollutionCareers/BusinessTeachers' Corner
water photo
What's New?

MSU conference explores need for greater international cooperation to protect vital global watersheds
MLive (11/25)
A recent Michigan State University workshop focused on water rights and improving cross-border policies for the protection of the great waters of the world.

VU students testing area waters
The Northwest Indiana Times (11/21)
Students of Valparaiso University, Ind., were at Lake Michigan to work on water quality measurements for an Environmental Protection Agency education project.

Forest Hills students put surf boards to the test in Lake Michigan
MLive (11/20)
Surf’s up! Well at least it was for some lucky students from Forest Hills Public Schools on Thursday, Nov. 19. Twenty students from each of the district’s three high schools had an opportunity to surf 10- to 12-foot waves at Grand Haven State Park, Mich.

City says yes to dock sale
Traverse City Record-Eagle (11/3)
In Traverse City, Mich., commissioners agreed to sell the coal dock marina to a group of nonprofit organizations focused on Great Lakes history, education and environmental protection to expand use for nonprofits and construct new, modern facilities.

TEACH Calendar of Events
What's going on in your neighborhood this month? Meet other people and learn together at recreational and educational events! Our new dynamic calendar is updated daily with current educational events.
Water levels on the Great Lakes

4 | How levels and flows are measured

Water levels are measured and recorded at many locations around the Great Lakes and on their connecting channels.

Click to see larger image.The National Ocean Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) presently operates 31 water level gages on the Great Lakes and 18 gages on the connecting channels. In Canada, the Canadian Hydrographic Service maintains 29 water level gages on the Great Lakes and 27 on the St. Lawrence River. Other agencies, including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York Power Authority and Ontario Power Generation, also operate recording gages at various locations on the lakes.

See also: Map of Great Lakes Water Level Gauging Stations

Great Lakes water levels are officially measured from the International Great Lakes Datum 1985 (IGLD 1985). This datum is referenced to sea level, as measured at Rimouski, Quebec, near the mouth of the St. Lawrence River. Because the crust of the earth in the Great Lakes region is continuously rising with respect to sea level, and the rate of movement is not uniform throughout the region, the IGLD must be updated every 25 to 30 years.

See also: FAQ about the International Great Lakes Datum

Click to see larger image.The rate of flow, or discharge, in a river or Great Lakes connecting channel is determined by measuring the channel depth and width, and the velocity of the flow. Measurements can be made by boat, from a bridge, or from a cableway strung across the river. With sufficient measurements of flow over a range of water levels, mathematical relationships can be developed between levels and discharges for various points along the connecting channels and the St. Lawrence River. These equations are essential to the coordination of outflow data, particularly related to hydroelectric power usage of Great Lakes waters.

Graphics: Water level gaging station; measuring outflows at the Niagara Cableway.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6   next page