teach.GLIN.net
GLIN Daily News About GLIN
AboutEnvironmentHistory/CultureGeographyPollutionCareers/BusinessTeachers' Corner
water photo
What's New?

Lessons in sailing, science
Superior Telegram (8/16)
A workshop offered by the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network has local educators on a six-day boat trip as part of the Duluth Tall Ships Festival.

NOAA to work with MTU scientists out on Lake Superior
WLUC-TV - Marquette, MI (8/16)
With the help of The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration or NOAA, Michigan Technological University scientists continue to learn about their surroundings.

Sturgeon hatchery to offer tours in Onaway
WPBN-TV - Traverse City, MI (8/10)
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is offering tours of the Black River sturgeon hatchery in Onaway. During the free tours, researchers will be available to talk about sturgeon biology, reproductive ecology and this year’s research.

TEACH Calendar of Events
What's going on in your neighborhood this month? Meet other people and learn together at recreational and educational events! Our new dynamic calendar is updated daily with current educational events.
How the Lakes Were Formed

table of contents
How the lakes were formed
Prehistoric glacial movements
Great Lakes system profile: Elevations and depths


How the lakes were formed

About a billion years ago, a fracture in the earth running from what is now Oklahoma to Lake Superior generated volcanic activity that almost split North America. Over a period of 20 million years, lava intermittently flowed from the fracture.

Lake Huron

This geomorphic age created mountains covering the regions now known as northern Wisconsin and Minnesota, and the Laurentian mountains were formed in eastern Canada. Over time these mountains eroded, while occasional volcanic activity continued. Molten magma below the highlands of what is now Lake Superior spewed out to its sides, causing the highlands to sink and form a mammoth rock basin that would one day hold Lake Superior. Eventually the fracture stabilized and, over time, the rock tilted down from north to south.

The region went from fire to ice with the arrival of the glaciers, which advanced and retreated several times over the last 5 million years. During the periods of glaciation, giant sheets of ice flowed across the land, leveling mountains and carving out massive valleys. Where they encountered more resistant bedrock in the north, only the overlying layers were removed. To the south, the softer sandstones and shales were more affected. As the glaciers melted and began receding, their leading edges left behind high ridges, some of which can be seen today in the cliffs of Door County, Wisconsin, and the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario. Huge lakes formed between these ridges from the retreating ice fronts, and continually changed over time as the ice sheet moved northward.

Watch the formation of the Great Lakes! [ Flash | HTML ]


1 | 2 | 3 next page