teach.GLIN.net
GLIN Daily News About GLIN
AboutEnvironmentHistory/CultureGeographyPollutionCareers/BusinessTeachers' Corner
water photo
What's New?

Coastal Centre concerned about plastic pollution in Lake Huron
Owen Sound Sun Times (7/17)
Everyone has a role to play in turning the tide on the growing problem of plastic pollution in the Great Lakes. That's the message from Ontario's Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation outreach specialist, who is working to educate people on simple ways to help combat the issue.

Elementary Adventure Day outing provides hands-on fun
The Ashland Daily Press (7/12)
Just over half-a-dozen youngsters gathered at the Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center, in Wisconsin, to participate in the first of this year’s three 4-H Elementary Adventure Day’s.

Summer interns help to research Lake Erie issues
The Toledo Blade (7/5)
Eleven college and university students from across the United States are studying freshwater lake issues this summer at the University of Toledo’s Lake Erie Center.

Anglers enlisted in water fight
Great Lakes Echo (6/29)
A recent study by researchers at Cornell University, in N.Y., revealed that anglers in the Great Lakes region are aware of and concerned about the threat of aquatic invasive species (AIS).

Lake State opens Sea Grant office
Sault Ste. Marie Evening News (6/29)
Lake Superior State University officially welcomed its new Michigan Sea Grant office to campus with a ribbon cutting ceremony Monday morning.

Stone Lab hosts series of experts to discuss lake
Port Clinton News Herald (6/28)
In Ohio, people looking to learn more about the issues facing Lake Erie will have several opportunities this summer to hear firsthand from the experts in the field who deal with those issues every day.

TEACH Calendar of Events
What's going on in your neighborhood this month? Meet other people and learn together at recreational and educational events! Our new dynamic calendar is updated daily with current educational events.
TEACH Invasive Species

table of contents
Introduction
The Zebra Mussel
Other species making headlines
How do invasive species get here?
Prevention and control
How can you prevent the spread of nonindigenous species?
References and more information

If you live on the Great Lakes or in a similar coastal area, you've no doubt heard of zebra mussels or sea lamprey. Chances are you've also seen patches of purple loosestrife growing in your community or on the side of a local highway. You might not have recogized this attractive flowering plant as a non-native species, but it is. Although pretty to look at, these purple stalks are choking out native plant species by overtaking and altering their habitat.

Sea Lamprey. Click to see larger image.These are just three of the more than 140 nonindigenous, or invasive, species that have become established in and around the Great Lakes since the 1800s. In fact, due in large part to increases in the volume of shipping traffic, the introduction of new "exotic" species has increased dramatically over the past 50 years. More than 87 nonindigenous aquatic species have been accidentally introduced into the Great Lakes in the 20th Century alone. Once introduced, invasive species must be managed and controlled, as they are virtually impossible to eradicate.

While many non-native species have no serious ecological impact, the introduction of a single key species can, as in the example of the sea lamprey, cause a sudden and dramatic shift in the entire ecosystem's structure. New species can significantly change the interactions between existing species (and between those species and their non-living environment), creating ecosystems that are unstable and unpredictable.

Graphic: Sea Lamprey shown attached to a lake trout. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7   Next page